ALFRED: allele frequency database
      The ALlele FREquency Database   
ALFRED is a resource of gene frequency data on human populations
supported by the Yale Center for Medical Informatics.

Sample Information:

Population NameSample NameALFRED UIDNumber of Chromosomes
HanSan Francisco ChineseSA000009J124

Relation to Other Samples: 
Estimated heterozygosities for various sites: 
Sample Description: A sample of Han Chinese living in the San Francisco, California. Collected by L. Cavalli-Sforza (Stanford University), K.K. Kidd, and J.R. Kidd. The first Chinese immigrants to the United States left their country for the opportunity to work and send money home to their family. Initially, in the mid-1800s, the Chinese were welcomed into California. In fact, in many cases they were recruited to build the railroads, work the mines, and tend the fields. They provided an affordable work force in California while everyone else was trying to strike it rich in the gold mines. As news of gold spread, over 100,000 Chinese came to California. They continued to be welcomed until the mines ran dry when foreigners were blamed for the cause of the problem. In 1862 American vessels were forbidden to transport Chinese immigrants to the US. In 1882 the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed and was upheld for sixty years. Under this Act only those who already had relatives in the US could enter. In 1910, Angel Island, in San Francisco Bay, was opened to enforce this act. Here thousands of Chinese were detained and deported. However, due to this act many immigrants brought false documentation of relatives in the United States and some still managed to enter. The modern Chinese American population has created a culture for itself in San Francisco. San Francisco is one of the largest Chinese American communities. Cantonese, the Chinese dialect spoken in Hong Kong and other southern Chinese provinces, is the major spoken form of Chinese in the San Francisco area. It is spoken by at least 100,000 San Franciscans.
References:
- Bowcock AM, Bucci C, Hebert JM, Kidd JR, Kidd KK, JS Friedlaender, Cavalli-Sforza LL "Study of 47 DNA markers in five populations from four continents.". Gene Geography 1:47. (1987) Online citation.

- Bowcock AM, Kidd JR, Mountain JL, Hebert JM, Carotenuto L, Kidd KK, Cavalli-Sforza LL. "Drift, admixture, and selection in human evolution: A study with DNA polymorphisms". Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA 88:839-43. (1991) Online citation.

- Castiglione CM, Deinard AS, Speed WC, Sirugo G, Rosenbaum HC, Zhang Y, Grandy DK, Grigorenko EL, Bonne-Tamir B, Pakstis AJ, Kidd JR, Kidd KK. "Evolution of haplotypes at the DRD2 locus". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 57:1445-56. (1995) Online citation.

- Chang FM, Kidd JR, Livak KJ, Pakstis AJ, Kidd KK. "The world-wide distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus". Hum. Genet. 98:91-101. (1996) Online citation.

- Kang AM, Palmatier MA, Kidd KK. "Global variation of a 40-bp VNTR in the 3'-untranslated region of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3)". Biological Psychiatry 46:151-60. (1999) Online citation.

- Kidd JR, Pakstis AJ, Kidd KK. "Global levels of DNA variation". Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Human Identification 1993 (Promega) 21-30. (1993)

- Kidd JR. "Population genetics and population history of Amerindians as reflected by nuclear DNA variation". Ph.D. dissertation, Yale University (1993)

- Kidd KK et al. http://info.med.yale.edu/genetics/kkidd/pops.html

- Kidd KK, Morar B, Castiglione CM, Zhao H, Pakstis AJ, Speed WC, Bonne-Tamir B, Lu RB, Goldman D, Lee C, Nam YS, Grandy DK, Jenkins T, Kidd JR. "A global survey of haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium at the DRD2 locus". Hum. Genet. 103:211-27. (1998) Online citation.

- Mateu E, Calafell F, Bonne-Tamir B, Kidd JR, Casals T, Kidd KK, Bertranpetit J. "Allele Frequencies in a Worldwide Survey of a CA Repeat in the First Intron of the CFTR Gene". Human Heredity 49:15-20. (1999) Online citation.

- Palmatier MA, Kang AM, Kidd KK. "Global variation in the frequencies of functionally different catechol-O-methyltransferase alleles". Biol. Psychiatry. 46:557-67. (1999) Online citation.

- Tishkoff SA, Dietzsch E, Speed W, Pakstis AJ, Cheung K, Kidd JR, Bonne-Tamir B, Santachiara-Benerecetti AS, Moral P, Watson E, Krings M, Paabo S, Risch N, Jenkins T, Kidd KK. "Global patterns of linkage disequilibrium at the CD4 locus and modern human origins". Science 271:1380-7. (1996) Online citation.

- Tishkoff SA, Goldman A, Calafell F, Speed WC, Deinard AS, Bonne-Tamir B, Kidd JR, Pakstis AJ, Jenkins T, Kidd KK. "A global haplotype analysis of the myotonic dystrophy locus: implications for the evolution of modern humans and for the origin of myotonic dystrophy mutations". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 62:1389-402. (1998) Online citation.

- Tishkoff SA, Goldman A, Calafell F, Speed WC, Deinard AS, Bonne-Tamir B, Kidd JR, Pakstis AJ, Jenkins T, Kidd KK. "A global haplotype analysis of the myotonic dystrophy locus: implications for the evolution of modern humans and for the origin of myotonic dystrophy mutations". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 62:1389-402. (1998) Online citation.

- Tishkoff SA, Ruano G, Kidd JR, Kidd KK. "Distribution and frequency of a polymorphic Alu insertion at the plasminogen activator locus in humans". Hum. Genet. 97:759-64. (1996) Online citation.



© 2019 Kenneth K Kidd, Yale University. All rights reserved. The full Copyright Notification is also available.
Originally prototyped by Michael Osier with the aid of Kei Cheung
Upgrades and maintenance since 2002 by Haseena Rajeevan